{"API Evangelist"}

Instead of Just Discussing Via Phone You Should Publish Your API Goings On To Your Blog

At any point in time, there are numerous emails in my inbox, LinkedIn messages, and DMS, asking me if I would "just jump on the phone to discuss the latest" about an API. I get a regular stream of these, which makes it pretty impossible for me to actually make time to do, and if I did make time to talk to each of these API providers, I wouldn't have time to actually write up stories and guides for my site.

I'm sure it can be frustrating for folks who just want to share the latest with me, but I hope you will understand that I am just a one man show, and I have to prioritize. I recommend that you also get better at managing your time, and write up each of the things you wanted to talk to me about as a blog post, and then share out via your API platform's Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook (you have all those right?). 

I am not a fan of being the recipient of embargoed or top-secret information, as EVERYTHING I do tends to be very public. If you publish your information as a blog post, it is much more likely that I will see it, and read it, than I will if it is an email. Plus you get the bonus of me being able to share out the link, and the wider API community getting to learn about it as well. It is just way more efficient for you to tell your story publicly than it is for us to jump on the phone--for both of us.

Handling yourself this way will continue to pay dividends, as the chances, I will write about something in the future increases if I have the link bookmarked--something that will rarely happen if we talk about on the phone. This played out in my story on the role API definitions are playing with API integrations, where I linked to ClearbitCronofyBest Buy, and SparkPost stories on their release of Run in Post Buttons. If they didn't tell the story on their blog, I would never have had a link to share in that story, and now this story--bonus two separate posts on API Evangelist, just because they had the forethought to tell the story of what they did.