{"API Evangelist"}

Keeping API Communications In Shape With Workbench Blogging

I consider about 75% of the content I create on my network of sites to be workbench blogging--where I tell the story of what I am working on each day. You can see this approach in action with my friend Guillaume Laforge (@glaforge) over at Google, with his post on a day in the life of a Developer Advocate for Google Cloud Platform. Guillaume is workbench blogging, pulling back the curtain on API operations a little bit, while also keeping API communications flowing.

This type of blogging isn't about any specific API, feature, or products and services. Workbench blogging really isn't about people learning any particular thing, they are more about pulling back the curtain, humanizing API operations, generating a little SEO, while also keeping the communication pipes open. The more you write, the easier it is to craft valuable stories. Not everyone will be reading these stories, but they are great for collecting your thoughts and even communicate internally with other stakeholders.

You know how many times I've used my blog to recall what I worked on last week, last month, and last year? I know this type of storytelling isn't for everyone, but if you want to be able to create quality content you need practice. Writing regularly is much easier when you write regularly. It helps to have several different areas to write in, allowing you to avoid writer's block by shifting gears to a new topic or just blogging about what was accomplished that day. People always ask how I am able to generate so much content for the blog(s), and staying in shape with workbench blogging is how I do it.

I consider about 75% of the content I create on my network of sites to be workbench blogging--where I tell the story of what I am working on each day. You can see this approach in action with my friend Guillaume Laforge (@glaforge) over at Google, with his post on a day in the life of a Developer Advocate for Google Cloud Platform. Guillaume is workbench blogging, pulling back the curtain on API operations a little bit, while also keeping API communications flowing.

This type of blogging isn't about any specific API, feature, or products and services. Workbench blogging really isn't about people learning any particular thing, they are more about pulling back the curtain, humanizing API operations, generating a little SEO, while also keeping the communication pipes flowing. The more you write, the easier it is to craft valuable stories. Not everyone will be reading these stories, but they are great for collecting your thoughts and even communicate internally with other stakeholders.

You know how many times I've used my blog to recall what I worked on last week, last month, and last year? I know this type of storytelling isn't for everyone, but if you want to be able to create quality content you need practice. Writing regularly is easier when you write regularly. It helps to have several different areas to write, allowing me to avoid writer's block by shifting gears to a new topic or just blogging about what I did that day. People always ask how I am able to generate so much content for the blog(s), and staying in shape with workbench blogging is how I do it.