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Learning About API Governance From Capital One DevExchange

I am still working through my notes from a recent visit to Capital One, where I spent time talking with Matthew Reinbold (@libel_vox) about their API governance strategy. I was given a walk through their approach to defining API standards across groups, as well as how they incentivize, encourage, and even measure what is happening. I’m still processing my notes from our talk, and waiting to see Matt publish more on his work, before I publish too many details, but I think it is worth looking at from a high level view, setting the bar for other API governance conversations I am engaging in.

First, what is API governance. I personally know that many of my readers have a lot of misconceptions about what it is, and what it isn’t. I’m not interesting in defining a single definition of API governance. I am hoping to help define it so that you can find it a version of it that you can apply across your API operations. API governance is at its simplest form, about ensuring consistency in how you do API across your development groups, and a more robust definition might be about having an individual or team dedicated to establishing organization-wide API standards, helping train, educate, enforce, and in the case of capital one, measure their success.

Before you can begin thinking about API governance, you need to start establishing what your API standards are. In my experience this usually begins with API design, but should also quickly also be about consistent, API deployment, management, monitoring, testing, SDKs, clients, and every other stop along the API lifecycle. Without well-defined, and properly socialized API standards, you won’t be able to establish any sort of API governance that has any sort of impact. I know this sounds simple, but I know more API providers who do not have any kind of API design, or other guide for their operations, than I know API providers who have consistent guides to design, and other stops along their API lifecycle.

Many API providers are still learning about what consistent API design, deployment, and management looks like. In the API industry we need to figure out how to help folks begin establishing organizational-wide API design guides, and get them on the road towards being able to establish an API governance program–it is something we suck at currently. Once API design, then deployment and management practices get defined we can begin to realize some standard approaches to monitoring, testing, and measuring how effective API operations are. This is where organizations will begin to see the benefits of doing API governance, and it not just being a pipe dream. Something you can’t ever realize if you don’t start with the basics like establishing an API design guide for your group. Do you have an API design guide for your group?

While talking with Matt about their approach at Capital One, he asked if it was comparable to what else I’ve seen out there. I had to be honest. I’ve never come across someone who had established API design, deployment, and management practices. Were actively educating and training their staff. Then actually measuring the impact and performance of APIs, and the teams behind them. I know there are companies who are doing this, but since I tend to talk to more companies who are just getting started on their API journey, I’m not seeing anyone organization who is this advanced. Most companies I know do not even have an API design guide, let alone measuring the success of their API governance program. It is something I know a handful of companies would like to strive towards, but at the moment API governance is more talk than it is ever a reality.

If you are talking API governance at your organization, I’d love to learn more about what you are up to. No matter where you are at in your journey. I’m going to be mapping out what I’ve learned from Matt, and compare with I’ve learned from other organizations. I will be publishing it all as stories here on API Evangelist, but will also look to publish a guide and white papers on the subject, as I learn more. I’ve worked with some universities, government agencies, as well as companies on their API governance strategies. API governance is something that I know many API providers are working on, but Capital One was definitely the furthest along in their journey that I have come across to date. I’m stoked that they are willing to share their story, and don’t see it as their secret sauce, as it is something that doesn’t just need sharing, it is something we need leaders to step up and show everyone else how it can be done.