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Their Security Practices Are Questionable But Their Communication Is Unacceptable

I study the API universe every day of the week, looking for common patterns in the way people are using technology. I study almost 100 stops along the API lifecycle, looking for healthy practices that companies, organizations, institutions, and government agencies can follow when dialing in their API operations. Along the way I am also looking for patterns that aren’t so healthy, which are contributing to many of the problems we see across the API sector, but more importantly the applications and devices that they are delivering valuable data, content, media, and algorithms to.

One layer of my research is centered around studying API security, which also includes keeping up with vulnerabilities and breaches. I also pay attention to cybersecurity, which is a more theatrical version of regular security, with more drama, hype, and storytelling. I’ve been reading everything I can on the Equifax, Accenture, and other scary breaches, and like the other areas of the industry I track on, I’m beginning to see some common patterns emerge. It is something that starts with the way we use (or don’t use) technology, but then is significantly amplified by the human side of things.

There are a number of common patterns that contribute to these breaches on the technical side, such as not enough monitoring, logging, and redundancy in security practices. However, there are also many common patterns emerging from the business approach by leadership during security incidents, and breaches. These companies security practices are questionable, but I’d say the thing that is the most unacceptable about all of these is the communication around these security events. I feel like they demonstrate just how dysfunctional things are behind the scenes at these companies, but also demonstrate their complete lack of respect and concern for individuals who are impacted by these incidents.

I am pretty shocked by seeing how little some companies are investing in API security. The lack of conversation from API providers about their security practices, or lack of, demonstrates how much work we still have to do in the API space. It is something that leaves me concerned, but willing to work with folks to help find the best path forward. However, when I see companies do all of this, and then do not tell people for months, or years after a security breach, and obfuscate, and bungle the response to an incident, I find it difficult to muster up any compassion for the situations these companies have put themselves in. Their security practices are questionable, but their communication around security breaches is unacceptable.