{"API Evangelist"}

An Introduction To Github For API Providers

I have had a number of requests from folks lately to write more about Github, and how they can use the social coding platform as part of their API operations. As I work with more companies outside of the startup echo chamber on their API strategies I am encountering more groups that aren't Github fluent and could use some help getting started. It has also been a while since I've thought deeply about how API providers should be using Github so it will allow me to craft some fresh content on the subject.

Github As Your Technical Social Network
Think of Github as a more technical version of Facebook, but instead of the social interactions being centered around wall posts, news links, photos, and videos, it is focused on engagement with repositories. A repository is basically a file folder that you can make public or private, and put anything you want into it. While code is the most common thing put into Github repositories, they often contain data file, presentations, and other content, providing a beneficial way to manage many aspects of API operations.

The Github Basics
When putting Github to use as part of your API operations, start small. Get your profile setup, define your organization, and begin using it to manage documentation or other simple areas of your operations--until you get the hang of it. Set aside any pre-conceived notions about Github being about code, and focus on the handful of services it offers to enable your API operations.

Managing API Operations With Github
There are a handful of ways I encourage API providers to consider using Github as part of their operations. I prefer to use Github for all aspects of API operations, but not every organization is ready for that--I encourage you to focus in these areas when you are just getting going:

Github is essential to API operations. There is no requirement for Github users to possess developer skills. Many types of users put Github to use in managing the technical aspects of projects to take advantage of the network effect, as well as the version control and collaboration introduced by the social platform. It's common for non-technical folks to be intimidated by Github, ad developers often encourage this, but in reality, Github is as easy to use as any other social network--it just takes some time to get used to and familiar it.

If you have questions about how to use Github, feel free to reach out. I'm happy to focus on specific uses of Github for API operations in more detail. I have numerous examples of how it can be used, I just need to know where I should be focusing next. Remember, there are no stupid questions. I am an advocate for everyone taking advantage of Github and I fully understand that it can be difficult to understand how it works when you are just getting going.