Fork me on GitHub

I spent most of the day yesterday, looking through 77 of the developer portals listed on the 18F Github portal. While I wanted to evaluate the quality and approach of each of the agencies, my goal for this review cycle was to look for any APIs that already had machine readable API definitions, or would be low hanging fruit for the creation of Swagger definitions, as part of my wider API discovery work.

I had just finished updating all my API Evangelist Network APIs to use verion 0.14 of APIs.json, and while I wait for the search engine APIs.io to update to support the new version, I wanted to see if I could start the hard work of applying API discovery to federal government APIs. 

Ideally all federal agencies would publish APIs.json on their own, placing it within the root of their domain, like they do with data.json, and provide an index of all of their APIs. Being all to familiar with how this stuff work, I know that if I want this to happen, I will have to generate APIs.json for many federal agencies first. However for the APis.json to have their intended impact, I need many of the APIs to have machine readable API definitions that I can point to--which equals more work for me! yay? ;-(

My thinking is that I will look through all of the 77 developer areas, and resulting APIs looking for the low hanging fruit. Basically I would grade each API on its viability to be included in my federal government API discovery work. I spent minimal amount of time look at each API, and in some cases looking for the API, before giving up. I would inspect the supporting developer area, and the actual interface for complexity, helping me understand how hard it would be to hand craft a Swagger spec, and APIs.json for each agency and their APIs. 

(warning contains my raw un-edited notes from doing this research, not suitable for children)

As I went through, I wrote a couple of notes:

  • National Climate Data Center is nice looking, and is a high profile--they should have a kick ass API!
  • Inversely NOAAA Climate Data Online very simple, clean and well done.
  • Department of Education is acceptable as dev area, only because of Socrata
  • National Renewable Energy Laboratory just gets it. They just get it.
  • Some of these are billed as developer areas, but really just a single API. It is a start I guess. 
  • I love me some Department of Labor. Their developer area and API is freak'n cool!
  • MyUSA citizen API has oAuth!!! WTF. How did I not notice this before? Another story, and work here.
  • MyUSA has really good, simple, high value, API resources. 
  • NASA ExoAPI not just API cool, but space cool!!
  • FOIA needs a fucking API. No excuses. FOIA needs an API!
  • Some APIs it might be better to go back to data source and recreate API from scratch, they are so bad.

I wanted to share some of my notes, before the long list of developer areas, and their APIs. There are some specific notes for each APIs, but much of it is very general, helping grade each API, so I can go back through the list of B grade or higher APIs, and figure out which are candidates for me to create a Swagger API definition, APIs.json and ultimately adding to APIs.io. 

For this work I went down the 77 federal agency links, which were billed as developer areas, but many were single APIs. So when a developer area resulted in multiple APIs, I grouped them together, and many of the agencies who have a single API I will group together, and include my commentary as necessary. I'm leaving the URLs visible to help as a reference, show the craziness of some of them, and because it would have been sooooo much work to apply all of them.

Let's start with the White House(http://www.whitehouse.gov/developers):

Next up is the USDA (http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/usda/usdahome?navid=USDA_DEVELOPER), which is a hodgepodge of service, no consistency whatsoever between services in interface, supporting content or anything. 

Overall I give USDA a D on all their APIs. A couple might be high value sources, and going after, but definitely not low hanging fruit for me. It would be easier to tackle as independent project for generating brand new APIs.

Next up is Department of Commerce (http://www.commerce.gov/developer), who definitely high some higher value resources, as well as some health API initiatives. 

Next with the Department of Defense (http://www.defense.gov/developer/)There are 8 things billed as aPIs, with a variety of datasets, API like things, and web services available.  Not really sure whats up? (D)

We have one by itself here:

Then the department of education who is just riding their data.gov work as API area:

  • Department of Education - http://www.ed.gov/developers - Lots of high value datasets. Says API, but is JSON file. Wouldn’t be hard to generate APIs for it all and make machine readable definitions. (B)

Next some energy related efforts:

  • Department of Energy - http://www.energy.gov/developers - Lots of datasets. Pretty presentation.  Could use some simple APIs,. Wouldn’t be much to pick high value data sets and create cache of them. (C)
  • Energy Information Administration - http://www.eia.gov/developer/ - Nice web API, simple clean presentation. Needs interactive docs. (B)
  • National Renewable Energy Laboratory - http://developer.nrel.gov/ - Close to a modern Developer area with web APIs. Uses standardized access (umbrella). Some of them have Swagger specs, the rest would be easy to create. (A)
  • Office of Scientific and Technical Information - http://www.osti.gov/XMLServices - Interfaces are pretty well designed, and Swagger specs would be straightforward. But docs are all PDF currently. (B)

Moving on to the Department of Health and Human Services (http://www.hhs.gov/developer), which all of their APis are somewhat cosistent, and provide simple resources:

The Food and Drug Administration (http://open.fda.gov) is one of the agencies that is definitely getting on board with APIs, they have some pretty nice implementations, but there there are some not so nice ones that need a lot of work:

Next up the Department of Homeland Security (http://www.dhs.gov/developer), where they have three APIs (its a start):

Then we have two agencies that have pretty simple API operations, so I'll group together:

Then we have several API developer efforts under the Department of Interior (http://www.doi.gov/developer):

Now we have some APIS coming out of law enforcement side of government, starting with Department of Justice (http://www.justice.gov/developer):

Now we get to one of my favorite afforts in the federal government

  • Department of Labor - http://developer.dol.gov/ - I love their developer area. They have a great API, easy to generate API definitions. (A)
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics - http://www.bls.gov/developers/ - Web APIs in there. Complex, and lots of work, but can be done. API Definitions Needed. (B)

Next we have the API efforts from Department of State (http://www.state.gov/developer):

Moving on to the Department of Transportation (http://www.dot.gov/developer):

Now let's head over to the Department of the Treasury (http://www.treasury.gov/developer):

The Department of Veterans Affairs (http://www.va.gov/developer) has some hope, because of the work I did in the fall.

Moving to another on of my favorite agencies, well quasi gov agencies:

One agency that appears to be on radar, but I really can't tell what is going on API wise:

  • Environmental Protection Agency - http://www.epa.gov/developer/ - There is a really nice layout to the area, with seemingly a lot of APIs, and they look like web APIs, but it looks like one API being represented as a much of methods? Would be too much work, but still hard to figure out WTF. (C)

The the Federal Communications Commission (http://www.fcc.gov/developers) has a lot of APIs going on, in various states of operation:

All by itself on the list, we have a bank one lonely bank:

  • Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis - http://api.stlouisfed.org/ - Good API and area, would be easy to generate API definitions. (B)

The General Services Administration (http://www.gsa.gov/developers/) definitely is ahead of the game when it comes to API design and deployment:

Once I reached the National Aeronautics and Space Administration http://open.nasa.gov/developer I found some really, really cool APIs:




comments powered by Disqus
Google+